Interview de Ton Roosendaal

Pour le projet apertus°, j'ai réalisé une interview de Ton Roosendaal, le créateur de blender, à propos de l'open source, des implications du open hardware, et de son utilisation d'une caméra closed-source pour son dernier court métrage.

Court extrait ci-dessous.

Plus d'infos ici : http://www.apertus.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=778

Présentation du projet de documentaire ici : http://www.apertus.org/hollywood


Transcript of this part (thanks kotakfilem & jikz3d):
"The main benefit of Blender, compared to commercial software is of course the price. And that's what people say, "Blender is free", not only free as in free software. But it's free as in gratis, no money, which is a good reason for people to be curious about it. But in the end if they use Blender for a while, they understand that free software, open source software means a lot more. And if you compare something like Maya or Max with Blender, I think Maya or Max offer you lots of really advanced, high quality technology, but because it's closed, it's not your stuff! So you can press some buttons and if you're luck [lucky], it will do what you want it to do, but because it's closed, you are always [shut] away from the actual technology. In Blender it is your stuff and if it doesn't work you can fix it or you can ask somebody to help fixing it, or you can help improving it. So the control over own technology is for many people, more important than the quality of the technology. And I think that's the same thing that's why you guys are making your own camera system. Was it's the fact that it's YOUR camera, is probably more important for you than the fact that you have a really good camera. Of course you want to have both, but if you buy a camera, yeah then what huh? You, if you are lucky, it's a really good system, you press the buttons and you might get out of it what Sony wants you to do with the camera, but it might be not what you actually want. That's why Blender is definitely much better than any other of the competition because of the openness and not so much of the free part."